FAQs: Government services

  1. Where can a person go with general complaints about services provided by Alberta government departments?

    The Alberta Ombudsman is a neutral and impartial service for investigating and resolving complaints about Alberta government services. For information about complaints, or to file a complaint online, go to the Alberta Ombudsman website.

  2. Is the federal government covered by the Alberta Human Rights Act?

    No. The federal government and all of its agencies, such as the Canada Revenue Agency, are not covered by the Alberta Human Rights Act. Activities of crown corporations, such as Canada Post, are also not covered. All concerns and complaints about human rights involving the federal government should be directed to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

  3. Is the RCMP covered by the AHR Act?

    No. Even though the RCMP operate police detachments throughout Alberta, it is a federally regulated organization. All concerns and complaints about human rights involving the RCMP should be directed to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

  4. Is workers' compensation covered by the AHR Act?

    Yes. Although the Workers' Compensation Board is partially independent from government, it is still considered a government service.

  5. Do aboriginal children in the care of Children's Services have to be placed in aboriginal foster homes?

    In Alberta, decisions about custody and care of children are made on the basis of the child's best interests. Ancestry is one factor that may be considered in making a determination about foster care or custody. Like other government services, Children's Services and its activities are subject to the AHR Act.

  6. Are court orders covered by the AHR Act?

    No. All court orders and decisions are not covered by the AHR Act. This includes all court orders regarding child custody and access.

  7. Are correctional facilities protected by the AHR Act?

    Only those prisoners held in provincial corrections facilities and remand facilities are covered by the AHR Act. All concerns and complaints about human rights involving federal corrections facilities should be directed to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

  8. Do government agencies have to provide assistive services for people with visual or hearing disabilities?

    Government agencies have to accommodate service users with disabilities, to the point of undue hardship. This means that in most cases government agencies must provide assistive services, although providing such services on demand might constitute undue hardship, particularly in rural locations. For more information about accommodation and undue hardship, see the interpretive bulletin Duty to accommodate.

Revised: February 1, 2010

 


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